Amazon

Voice Technology Helping Patients In and Out of Hospitals

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With the proliferation of devices such as the Google Home and Amazon Alexa, consumers have increasingly become accustomed to using voice technologies to send and receive information. Livongo, a chronic conditions management platform, has recently announced the launch of a new voice tool feature for its users. It is called "Cuff to Cloud" and is powered by Amazon Lex and Polly. It allows Livongo users to upload their blood pressure readings through a voice-enabled cellular blood pressure monitoring system. By running the data through the company’s AI+AI engine, users will receive personalized “health nudges” such as suggestions to reduce their sodium intake.

Hospitals are also evaluating the use of voice technologies to decrease inefficiencies and improving patient satisfaction. Cedars-Sinai is currently running a 100-hospital room pilot to assess the capabilities of a patient-centered voice assistant platform. Each room is equipped with an Amazon Echo run by Avia (an Alexa-powered platform). In addition to the standard Amazon Alexa features, patients can request help through the device. If the request is not answered in a timely manner, Aiva automatically sends it up the chain of command to notify the relevant personnel. By moving patient interaction into the 21st century, Cedars-Sinai hopes that a smart room will have a positive impact on patient satisfaction for both patients and nurses. Adrienne Edwards, an early user of the platform, praised the smart addition to her room. Feeling lonely, she asked the smart device, “Alexa, will you be my friend?” The device responded, “Of course we could be friends. You seem very nice.”

From personalized health recommendations to expediting patient-provider communication flow, voice technology is rapidly gaining traction among the patient population. What’s left to see is how fast can the technology be adapted to healthcare-specific settings with an inherent focus on patient privacy.